Pharos-Tribune

State News

February 28, 2013

Pence vows to push tax cut ‘relentlessly’

Lanane says people at forums don't support governor's plan

INDIANAPOLIS — Having failed to convince state lawmakers in his own party to embrace his tax cut plan, Gov. Mike Pence is taking his message on the road.

At a news conference Wednesday, the Republican Pence said he was “burning up a lot of miles around Indiana” to convince Hoosiers that House Republicans are wrong to want to spend more money on roads and schools rather than pay for a 10 percent reduction in the state income tax — a key campaign promise he made last year.

Pence, repeating his oft-repeated phrase that he’s “very disappointed” that GOP lawmakers have so far rejected his tax-cut plan, said he’s going on the road to promote it “cheerfully, respectfully and relentlessly.”

He said he’s been traveling the state “at a pretty brisk pace, talking to Hoosiers in diners and at dinners and at everywhere in between” about the tax cut that Republican legislators have called unsustainable.

Asked if he planned to start running TV ads to bring pressure on Republican legislators, Pence declined to answer specifically, though said he wouldn’t be spending any money raised for his transition into office on “a political activity.”

He also wouldn’t rule out the possibility of vetoing the budget bill if it didn’t contain his proposed tax cut, though said it was too early to speculate.

Pence’s comments came two days after Republicans who control the Indiana House passed a $30 billion, two-year budget that increases funding for transportation infrastructure and education by more than $520 million.

Missing from the House plan is what Pence has said is his No. 1 priority: a reduction in Indiana’s individual income tax rate from 3.4 percent to 3.06 percent. It would reduce state revenues by $720 million in the first two years as it’s phased in, and $500 million a year after that.

Pence, citing the state’s $2 billion surplus, said he’s convinced the state can afford the revenue reductions that would result from his tax cut, even with the looming federal sequestration, the automatic budget cuts, set to hit Friday, that will reduce federal education, military and other payments to the state.

So far, Pence has failed to convince the Republican lawmakers who have super-majorities in both the House and Senate of the same.

House Democratic Leader Scott Pelath of Michigan City, whose caucus voted against the House budget bill because it didn’t include enough money for education, mocked the split between Pence and GOP lawmakers, saying the latter group was “ruining” the new governor’s “honeymoon.”

Meeting with reporters Wednesday morning, Pelath predicted Senate Republicans would try to make some kind of deal on the proposed tax cut as a way to “salvage the governor’s dignity.”

But Senate Republicans have also expressed their skepticism of the Pence plan; the chairmen of the Senate appropriations and the Senate tax and fiscal policy committee have both questioned whether the state could afford the long-term impact of the revenue reductions it would bring.

So Pence is out drumming up support for the plan with Hoosier voters, hoping they’ll put some pressure on their legislators.

Pence said his tax cut plan is getting a good reception from audiences around the state, though he complained that people didn’t know enough about its details.

As Pence told reporters Wednesday, he’s convinced that his tax cut plan will lead to more job creation by reducing the tax burden on small business owners and leaving more dollars in the pockets of working Hoosiers. Under the plan, the average Hoosier would see their tax burden reduced by about $100. A small business owner making $200,000 a year would see a reduction of about $1,000.

Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane of Anderson questioned how successful Pence will be in trying to convince voters to pressure GOP lawmakers to trade off more dollars for schools and roads, for Pence’s tax cut.

Lanane said when he’s met with voters at public forums, they don’t support the tax cut: “They say, ‘We have better things to spend it on.”  

Maureen Hayden covers the Statehouse for the CNHI newspapers in Indiana. She can be reached at maureen.hayden@indianamediagroup.com.

 



 

1
Text Only | Photo Reprints
State News
  • Family: 2013 crash that killed 7 was preventable MUNSTER (AP) — An Indiana woman who lost seven family members in a fiery highway crash last year says more needs to be done to ensure truck drivers are operating safely. Judith Williams said she believes the accident that killed her two daughters, th

    August 15, 2014

  • Man sentenced to 8 years in Gary man's killing CROWN POINT (AP) — A Gary man whose murder confession was thrown out because a police detective had told him he might not get a fair trial because he is black has been sentenced to eight years in prison after pleading guilty to reckless homicide. The

    August 15, 2014

  • Prosecutors seek life without parole for skipping shooter INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors have requested life without parole for a murder defendant caught on surveillance video skipping away from the fatal shooting of an Indianapolis convenience store clerk. Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry announced Th

    August 15, 2014

  • Suits in triple-slaying proceeds case move ahead NEW ALBANY, Ind. (AP) — A former Indiana state trooper shouldn't be allowed to claim all $626,000 in insurance and estate proceeds from the deaths of his wife and two children 14 years ago, even though he was acquitted of their murders, attorneys rep

    August 14, 2014

  • Indiana universities face cuts if tax intake lags INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana's public universities could see their budgets cut another 2 percent if state tax collections continue lagging behind expectations. Gov. Mike Pence's budget director told members of the State Budget Committee Thursday that

    August 14, 2014

  • Purdue writing commercial dog breeding standards WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — The director of Purdue University's Center for Animal Welfare Science will lead a two-year research project to develop and test nationwide animal care standards for the commercial breeding and raising of dogs. Director Can

    August 14, 2014

  • No charges filed in deaths of Clydesdale horses HUNTINGTON (AP) — Northeastern Indiana prosecutors have decided not to file charges in a case where dead and malnourished Clydesdales were discovered on a horse farm. Huntington County Prosecutor Amy Richison says she could not file charges because n

    August 14, 2014

  • E. Indiana couple arrested for dealing steroids RUSHVILLE (AP) — An eastern Indiana couple are under arrest after what authorities broke up what they are calling the largest lab ever found in Indiana for producing anabolic steroids. Rushville Police Chief Craig Tucker says 39-year-old David Starke

    August 13, 2014

  • Judge: Indiana can sue IRS over health care rules INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A federal judge has ruled Indiana and nearly 40 state school districts can sue the Internal Revenue Service over rules it imposed to implement the federal health care overhaul. The judge on Tuesday declined an IRS request to dismi

    August 13, 2014

  • Indiana receives $475,000 for students' exams INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indiana Department of Education is receiving nearly $475,000 from the federal government to help defray the costs of taking advanced placement tests for low-income students. The U.S. Department of Education announced the award

    August 13, 2014

Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Poll

Does Indiana need a statewide water management plan and an administrator to implement it?

Yes
No
Unsure
     View Results
Featured Ads
AP Video
Changes Coming to No-Fly List Raw: IDF Footage Said to Show Airstrikes Police: Ferguson More Peaceful Raw: Aftermath of Airstrike in Gaza Raw: Thousands March on Pakistani Parliament Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan Fire Crews Tame Yosemite Fire Raw: Police Weapon Drawn Near Protesters, Media Raw: Deadly Landslides in Japan Raw: Explosions in Gaza As Airstrikes Resume Arrests Witnessed in Ferguson Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape Texas Gov. Perry: Indictment 'a Political Act' US Officials: Video Shows American's Beheading Video Shows Ferguson Cop Months Before Shooting Water Bottles Recalled for Safety Researcher Testing On-Field Concussion Scanners
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.