Pharos-Tribune

November 20, 2012

PUBLIC FORUM: Romney’s comments ignore the truth


Pharos-Tribune

— Not only has Gov. Romney proven himself to be a sore loser with his most recent comments accusing our commander-in-chief of bribing students, minorities and the poor to get their votes, he has also continued to ignore the truth in the way our government distributes our tax dollars. A little over half of the national budget goes to fund Social Security, Medicare and our nation’s defense. Another 30 percent or so funds unemployment benefits (15 percent), health costs (10 percent), interest on our debt (6 percent) and foreign aid (1 percent). That leaves roughly 15 percent of our money up for grabs. That would be $570 billion out of The White House’s proposed budget this year to be spread around by Congress.

How much of this money does anyone think will make it into the pocket of the average citizen just trying to make ends meet? Isn’t it more likely that powerful interests with the money to hire an army of lobbyists to make their voices heard in the halls of Congress see the bulk of  our tax dollars? It is definitely not just those in need that benefit from the redistribution of wealth that takes place in our version of socialism. An even more pointed question can be asked of Mr. Mitt Romney due to his misleading comments. How much U.S. government money has been given in the cause of furthering his career or personal life?  His company, Bain Capital, was the beneficiary of millions of dollars from federal bailouts. The turnaround of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City engineered by Mr. Romney was fueled by over a billion dollars that various government agencies poured into Utah. Even the Romneys’ horse, Rafalca, that competed at this year’s Summer Olympics allows them to get a tax break of $77,000 a year.

It seems high time after nearly eight years of campaigning for the nation’s highest office for Gov. Romney to quietly and gracefully leave the public eye. It is also time for those of his political persuasion to admit how they and the powerful interests they defend benefit greatly from how the U.S. government invests its money. Their divisive politics bemoaning any public assistance given to those who need it most while refusing to acknowledge the federal largess that is heaped upon those with so much smacks of hypocrisy of the highest order.

Ernest Bowman, Kokomo