Pharos-Tribune

September 30, 2009

Missouri murder suspect son of fallen trooper

Prosecution files formal charges against former Logan man

by Kevin Lilly

The son of an Indiana State trooper killed in the line of duty by a murder suspect more than 38 years ago has been formally charged in a double homicide in Missouri.

On Wednesday, Cole County Prosecutor Mark Richardson filed six felony counts against 54-year-old David Russell Hosier in the shooting death of his former lover, 45-year-old Angela Gilpin, and her 61-year-old husband, Rodney Gilpin.

Hosier, the son of the late ISP Detective Glen Hosier, is accused of using a 9mm to gun down the couple in the doorway of Angela’s apartment, located just down the hill from the murder suspect’s residence in Jefferson City.

Hosier was captured some seven hours later and more than 300 miles away after a nationwide all-points bulletin was issued by Missouri authorities for Hosier and his 2000 Pontiac.

Charges include two counts of murder, two counts of armed criminal action and single counts of burglary and unlawful possession of a firearm. If convicted, Hosier faces the death penalty or life in prison without parole.

Hosier remains in the Cherokee County Jail in Muskogee, Okla. He has “invoked his right to an attorney and refused to make a statement,” according to court records. As of Wednesday, an extradition hearing had yet to be scheduled.

Jefferson City Detective Mark Edwards said in a probable cause affidavit that police not only found numerous loaded weapons, a bulletproof vest and “documentation linking him to Gilpin,” they also reportedly discovered shell casings in Hosier’s vehicle similar to those left at the crime scene.

Court records also indicated that Angela Gilpin had been trying to break off the relationship with Hosier for about two months. Police say they located evidence on Angela that she feared being shot by Hosier.

Hosier reportedly told a neighbor the night before the killings that he intended to “eliminate the problem.”

Court records stated that Angela told her landlord that Hosier had been stalking her and that she needed to move. Hosier actually worked as a maintenance manager for the landlord, who had taken keys to the apartment complex away from Hosier in an attempt to prevent him from gaining access to Angela’s apartment.

The Jefferson City News Tribune reported Wednesday that Angela and Rodney were trying to reconcile.

This is not Hosier’s first encounter with law enforcement. In Indiana during the 1990s, he served six years of an eight-year sentence for battery. In that case, Hosier was accused of holding a woman hostage for several hours while he beat her.

In a motion to modify his sentence after the 1993 conviction, Hosier represented himself. His failed argument to reduce his prison time included the success of his counseling sessions with a behavioral clinician.

“Since the defendant has started these meetings,” his motion read, “he better understands himself and is not likely to ever commit another offense of this nature or of any other nature.”

Hosier, a Logansport High School graduate, was 16 when his father was shot to death in April 1971 by Linde Mallard, a suspect in the murder of a woman whose body had been found at Catholic Cemetery in Peru.

He was shot as he climbed the stairs of a Miami County residence in search of Mallard. She died inside the home as it burned while exchanging gunfire with police.

David Hosier attended the 2001 dedication of the West Market Street Bridge that is now named for his father.

• Kevin Lilly is news editor of the Pharos-Tribune. He can be reached at (574) 732-5117 or kevin.lilly@pharostribune.com.