Pharos-Tribune

April 18, 2013

Logansport, Army Corps engineers plan fix for river wall

Gap to be filled with large concrete blocks.

by Mitchell Kirk
Pharos-Tribune

LOGANSPORT — The Logansport Department of Public Works has established a plan to remedy the partially-collapsed river wall on East Linden Avenue.

A 20-to-30-foot section of the concrete river wall collapsed at 207 and 211 E. Linden Ave. in January, causing the partial collapse of a shared garage on the properties. The garage has since been demolished and the river has been cleared of debris that resulted in the partial collapse.

Logansport Building Commissioner Bill Drinkwine said as soon as the ground is dry enough, the city will be working alongside B&G Construction to replace the missing section of the wall with six-foot-long concrete blocks installed in a stair-step fashion.

After B&G cranes the blocks into place, the Logansport Street Department will be pouring gravel in behind the wall to help prevent it from washing away. The department will be laying sand, dirt and grass seed between the wall and the backyards of the properties as well.

Dan Williams, Logansport superintendent of Public Works, said the street department will also be on standby to assist B&G throughout the project.

“We’ll be assisting in whatever they need us to do,” he said.

Drinkwine said he expects the project to take about two days.

Consultation from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which monitors civil engineering projects on waterways, is often sought for these kinds of projects. Sometimes permits for projects are required as well.

“If they go below the ordinary high water mark, they would need a permit,” said Andrew Roberts, a regulatory specialist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Louisville district, whose jurisdiction area includes Logansport.

Because the new wall on East Linden Avenue won’t be entering into the flow line of the river, a permit process is not required by the Corps of Engineers.

“They have reviewed everything we’ve proposed to do and concur with our repair process,” Drinkwine said.

Drinkwine said the project will cost around $6,000. Because the wall spans across two properties, he said equal bills will be issued to both homeowners. One of the owners is Jeff Murray, who the city continues to have trouble reaching regarding problems with several of his properties across town.

Drinkwine said he is continuing to utilize U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the Cass County Historical Society to research who is ultimately responsible if and when this kind of incident occurs again — the city or the homeowners.

“I think if the economic times were different, you’d have more support from government agencies like the Army Corps of Engineers and the [Department of Natural Resources],” he said. “With a lot of surplus funding being cut, there aren’t a lot of options out there.”

Mitchell Kirk is a staff reporter at the Pharos-Tribune. He can be reached at 574-732-5130 or mitchell.kirk@pharostribune.com.

 

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