Pharos-Tribune

August 16, 2013

Thorns & Roses


Pharos-Tribune

---- — Investing in our future

The Pharos-Tribune extends the following Rose to the A. Raymond company, owners of A. Raymond Tinnerman in Logansport:

With something close to $4 million invested over the last year, the A. Raymond family-owned company is sure leaving its mark on Logansport. And it’s a good one. The company’s local fastener plant once teetered on the brink of closure, but has become a competitive force in the global market since A. Raymond bought the old Elco manufacturing plant in 2009. It’s gotten a facelift this spring and summer, most of it through local contractors, and plant manager Keith Holms estimates some $2.5 to 3 million more will be invested per year in the plant for the next several years. Not only does that keep business flowing into Logansport, it keeps our skilled workers employed.

Up from the ashes

The Pharos-Tribune extends this Rose to Sublette’s Ribs in Monticello:

Like the song from children’s favorite “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” says, “up from the ashes grow the roses of success.” That seems to be the case with Sublette’s Ribs in Monticello, which literally grew from the ashes of a fire June 20, 2012, that engulfed the family-owned eatery. Sublette’s reopened this summer just three days before the first anniversary of the fire, thanks to friends, patrons and local businesses who helped owner Dan Sublette, his brother-in-law and his head cook rebuild. And now, Dan Sublette said business is better than he thought it would be after the prolonged closure. A big congrats to a small business overcoming such a setback.

Big steps for little feet

The Pharos-Tribune extends this Rose to area children returning to school this week:

Boarding the big yellow bus can be pretty scary, especially if you’re 6 years old and it’s your first time. We congratulate all the area youngsters who on Tuesday and Wednesday braved the unknown to start their first week of the 2013-14 school year. Some of you held tight to Mom, Dad, Grandma or your older sibling as you walked in the doors, and maybe some of you cried — just a little. It’s okay. And some of you older kids waltzed into the hallways like it was just another day in Loganland. We’re proud of you, too, and we’re sure you’ll keep at it till you get the chance to turn that tassel.