Pharos-Tribune

February 9, 2014

Ruler Foods grocery to open on east side

Thrifty Shopper closes.

by Sarah Einselen Pharos-Tribune
Pharos-Tribune

---- — A company spokesman has confirmed a Ruler Foods store is getting ready to move in on Logansport’s east side.

The newly launched arm of Jay C Foods, a Kroger Co. division, operates just 24 stores nationwide including 14 in Indiana, but several more are in the works, Jay C spokesman Mark Belleville said.

He anticipates opening Logansport’s within the first half of this year.

A Ruler Foods store sells groceries, fresh meat, produce, baked goods, frozen food and dairy products as well as household essentials like cleaning supplies, baby food and pet food, Belleville said.

The vast majority of Ruler Foods store merchandise is Kroger brand, Belleville added. Where Kroger has no house brand the store carries some branded products.

“They are a much smaller footprint,” Belleville said. “We only carry maybe 2,500 items, where a normal Kroger might carry 20,000 items.”

Ruler Foods recently signed a contract to lease a storefront in Eastgate Plaza on Market Street, where contractors have carried out more than $400,000 worth of remodels since the fall.

In general, Ruler Foods stores’ space ranges from 10,000 to 18,000 square feet. The stores usually employ 12 to 20 full-and part-time employees.

Belleville said Logansport was chosen as a new Ruler Foods site based on the area’s demographics and distance from any other Kroger store.

However, moving near where other groceries were already located wasn’t intentional, he said. “It really just comes down to where the land is actually available.”

Thrifty Shopper shutters

The Thrifty Shopper, a young used goods store in downtown Logansport, recently closed its doors.

A “for rent” sign went up recently in the store’s window at 606 E. Broadway after The Thrifty Shopper had been in business just over 15 months. Posts to The Thrifty Shopper’s Facebook page indicate owner Lauren Waldron closed the shop after packing up merchandise on Jan. 11 and 12.

Waldron did not return messages asking for comment.

Over the summer, Waldron had mounted a vigorous campaign against holding charity roadblocks at the corner of Broadway and Sixth Street near her shop, saying they cut business on an average Friday from around $300 to nearly nothing.

The used goods store’s demise isn’t unusual among small business startups. Almost a quarter of businesses shut down after less than a year in business and one-third are closed by their second anniversary, according to 2010 data gathered by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Sarah Einselen is news editor at the Pharos-Tribune. She can be reached at sarah.einselen@pharostribune.com or 574-732-5151. Twitter: @PharosSME